The Latest: Intel CEO Addresses Security Flaw In Its Chips

Intel Corp. has big plans to steer toward new business in self-driving cars, virtual reality and other cutting-edge technologies. But first it has to pull out of a skid caused by a serious security flaw in its processor chips, which undergird many of the world's smartphones and personal computers.

Intel Chief Executive Brian Krzanich opened his keynote talk Monday night at the annual CES gadget show in Las Vegas by addressing the hard-to-fix flaws disclosed by security researchers last week. At an event known for its technological optimism, it was an unusually sober and high-profile reminder of the information security and privacy dangers lurking beneath many of the tech industry's wonders.

Some researchers have argued that the flaws reflect a fundamental hardware defect that can't be fixed without a recall. But Intel has pushed back against that idea, arguing that the problems can be “mitigated” by software or firmware upgrades. Companies including Microsoft and Apple have announced efforts to patch the vulnerabilities.

And Krzanich promised fixes in the coming week to 90% of the processors Intel has made in the past five years, consistent with an earlier statement from the company. He added that updates for the rest of those recent processors should follow by the end of January. Krzanich did not address the company's plans for older chips.

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During his presentation Monday, Krzanich also launched into a flashy and wide-ranging celebration of the way Intel and its partners are harnessing data for futuristic innovations, such as 3-D entertainment partnerships with Paramount Pictures, virtual-reality collaborations with the 2018 Winter Olympics and a new breakthrough in so-called quantum computing.

A self-driving Ford Fusion rolled onto the stage of the casino theater where Krzanich gave his talk. It's the first of a 100-vehicle test fleet run by Mobileye, the Israeli software company that Intel bought for $15 billion last year. Mobileye processes the information cars “see” from cameras and sensors.

A flying taxi — the German-built Volocopter — later lifted off from the stage. Then came drones, in a musical performance that Krzanich said would mark a Guinness record for the “world's first 100-drone indoor light show without GPS.”

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>Riverside County authorities address Perris child-captivity case as neighbors react
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Perris residents were shocked to learn of allegations against David Allen Turpin and Louise Anna Turpin, who were arrested on suspicion of torture and child endangerment after authorities said their 13 children had been chained and malnourished inside their home.

Perris residents were shocked to learn of allegations against David Allen Turpin and Louise Anna Turpin, who were arrested on suspicion of torture and child endangerment after authorities said their 13 children had been chained and malnourished inside their home.

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>Riverside County authorities address Perris child-captivity case as neighbors react
CAPTION

Perris residents were shocked to learn of allegations against David Allen Turpin and Louise Anna Turpin, who were arrested on suspicion of torture and child endangerment after authorities said their 13 children had been chained and malnourished inside their home.

Perris residents were shocked to learn of allegations against David Allen Turpin and Louise Anna Turpin, who were arrested on suspicion of torture and child endangerment after authorities said their 13 children had been chained and malnourished inside their home.

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Here are seven of the week's biggest stories.

Here are seven of the week's biggest stories.

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Debris and mud clogged the road between Santa Barbara and Carpinteria.

Debris and mud clogged the road between Santa Barbara and Carpinteria.

>Parents arrested after children found shackled and malnourished in Perris home
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Authorities found several of their 13 children shackled and malnourished inside their home.

Authorities found several of their 13 children shackled and malnourished inside their home.

>Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin confirms President Trump's language
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Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin, the Senate’s second-ranking Democrat, said President Trump “said things which were hate-filled, vile and racist” during a meeting on Thursday .

Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin, the Senate’s second-ranking Democrat, said President Trump “said things which were hate-filled, vile and racist” during a meeting on Thursday .

Source : http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-intel-chip-ces-20180109-story.html

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